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Analytical Reflection on Oral Presentation

On the 16th of November 2017, I did a presentation with my team to ‘sell’ our solution to solving SIT’s electricity wastage woes. Personally, I do not think that I have done well for it because by being spontaneous with my words, the tendency to go off-topic or beat around the bush was high, and it have happened once during my presentation. With only 3 key points on my slide and elaborations in my head, I went bringing the audience a full circle round the same point during the ‘Evaluations’ section. Moreover, everyone could see that I was nervous, as seen by a laser pointer that shakes uncontrollably each time I point at the screen.
Improvements can be made to my presentation. I could have written notes in my hand, but, to me, that’s very amateur. I rather speak on the spot and be free to move. The best way to deliver a presentation is to be familiar with the content. Be one with the project.
According to what I have written in my first blogpost in this communications class, I mention…

Technical Report Draft 1

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1  Introduction Energy conservation in Singapore has been on the rise in recent years. As an open economy with no natural resources, Singapore is vulnerable to rising energy costs that can affect our economic competitiveness. It is therefore crucial that we take steps towards becoming more energy efficient.

In the Dover campus of Singapore Institute of Technology (hereby known as SIT@Dover), there is a tendency for students to leave the classrooms without switching off the lights. Students of SIT@Dover have indicated that there might be another class going on later and requires no necessity to switch them off. Moreover, students, in a rush for the next class, might forget to switch the lights off. Coincidentally, there are students who do not even bother about energy conservation.

With students developing such energy-wasting behaviour, the probability of students not switching off the lights is rather high. As such, security guards have to switch off the lights in every classrooms aroun…

Reader Response on Cladding Draft 3

In the article “Use of Cladding in Buildings Here Have Grown in Recent Times”, Mokhtar (2017) reported the increasing use of cladding in Singapore and its benefits and risks. He defines cladding as a layer of panels added to the exterior facade of buildings to cut energy use, improve building appearance and provide shade. However, he points out that the use of cladding came under the intense scrutiny after the Grenfell Tower fire tragedy, where the fire had spread upwards rapidly due to the ventilation gaps between the cladding and the building’s wall, drawing oxygenated air from the bottom of the facade and fueling the fire. Mokhtar iterates that the use of cladding in Singapore is regulated, where the cladding material must not allow fire to spread along its surface when ignited.
While it is undeniable that the use of cladding has many advantages, it is crucial to review the materials used in its design, where the material property, combustibility, is critical in improving fire safe…

Reader Response on Cladding Draft 2

Readers Response In the article, “Use of Cladding in Buildings Here Have Grown in Recent Times” (Mokhtar, 2017), reported the increasing use of cladding in Singapore and its benefits and risks. Cladding is a layer of panels added to the exterior facade of buildings to cut energy use, improve building appearance or provide shade. The use of cladding, however, came under the limelight after the Grenfell Tower fire tragedy. The fire had spread upwards rapidly due to the ventilation gaps between the cladding and the building’s wall, drawing oxygenated air from the bottom of the facade and fueling the fire. In Singapore, the use of cladding is regulated. For example, cladding material must not allow fire to spread along its surface when ignited. Besides meeting statutory regulations, a building owner was cited to have included measures to prevent fire from spreading between levels and regular certification of fire protection systems. While it is undeniable that the use of cladding has many …

Reader Response on Cladding Draft 1

In the article, “Use of Cladding in Buildings Here Have Grown in Recent Times”, Mokhtar (2017) reported the increasing use of cladding in Singapore and its benefits and risks. Cladding is a layer of panels added to the exterior facade of buildings to cut energy use, improve building appearance or provide shade. The use of cladding, however, caught attention worldwide after the Grenfell Tower fire tragedy. The fire had spread upwards rapidly due to the ventilation gaps between the cladding and the building’s wall, drawing oxygenated air from the bottom of the facade and fueling the fire. In Singapore, the use of cladding is regulated. For example, cladding material must not allow fire to spread along its surface when ignited. Besides meeting statutory regulations, a building owner was cited to have included measures to prevent fire from spreading between levels and regular certification of fire protection systems. While it is undeniable that the use of cladding has many advantages, it …

Summary Draft 1

In the article, “Use of Cladding in Buildings Here Have Grown in Recent Times” (Mokhtar, 2017), reported the increasing use of cladding in Singapore and its benefits and risks. Cladding is a layer of panels added to the exterior facade of buildings to cut energy use, improve building appearance or provide shade. The use of cladding, however, came under intense scrutiny after the Grenfell Tower fire tragedy. The fire had spread upwards rapidly due to the ventilation gaps between the cladding and the building’s wall, drawing oxygenated air from the bottom of the facade and fueling the fire. In Singapore, the use of cladding is regulated. For example, cladding material must not allow fire to spread along its surface when ignited. Besides meeting statutory regulations, a building owner was cited to have included measures to prevent fire from spreading between levels and regular certification of fire protection systems. Cladding has its usefulness, but its associated risks need to be mitig…

Formal Self-introductory Letter

Subject: Formal Letter of Self-introduction

Dear Mr. Blackstone,

My name is Keric and I graduated from diploma in materials science from Singapore Polytechnic. As a science graduate, I found that engineering was similar to what I had studied and I decided to enroll into Sustainable Infrastructure Engineering (Land) (SIEL) in Singapore Institute of Technology (SIT). SIEL gave me the hope of securing a job that is on-site and in-the-field, rather than being stuck behind a desk 5 days a week.

I am somewhat confident of presenting a message or content to an audience, regardless of size. Back in my polytechnic days, I had numerous formal presentations. I even had an opportunity to share an opening speech to a new cluster of science freshmen as the president of the Freshmen Orientation Programme 2014 Committee. I have had peers who commented that my command of English was exceptional, although I honestly believe that preparation, rather than great command of English, is key to any presentat…